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Sorry means never doing it again

Sorry means never doing it again

I mentioned in my last post about becoming absorbed in the subject of the Stolen Generation. I’ve decided I’m going to try to write a proper feature about it, because I believe there’s a message that needs to be put out there – I’d like to do my small part. At the very least I’ll post it in this blog. I wanted to muse a little here today as a preface. I’m hoping to post it on or before National Sorry Day however it’s a perennial relevant topic and we shouldn’t just think about it on one day a year.

You dig deeper and deeper into the internet, as I said in the previous post. You read articles and statistics and reports. You watch videos and read statements of indigenous people who have first hand experience of the Stolen Generation. And as a white Australian, I feel ashamed. Sad. Fearful for the indigenous people of this country.

This morning I had one of the greatest privileges of my life – I had a long talk with Aunty Hazel Collins from Grandmothers Against Removals. I’ll leave the content of our discussion to the main feature. Suffice to say at this point that, with National Sorry Day approaching, the fact that we as a nation said sorry must be an insult to Australia’s indigenous people. Sorry means you don’t do it again. Ladies and gentleman, it’s still happening.

I feel humbled to have Aunty Hazel in my contacts list and that we promised to remain in touch. With Aunty Hazel at the helm of the movement to stem the tide of stolen children, I think Australians who care can have a glimmer of hope for the future. I hope that I can help with her voice, somehow.

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