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Australia’s Drought Crisis

Australia’s Drought Crisis

Time to get serious. I know we all need fluff and light relief every now and then, but we also need to think about those doing it tough on our own back doorstep.

I was sitting in my favourite spot at home this morning, with “Scrublands”, a coffee, happy dogs at my feet, well-fed horses in the paddock, chooks doing their chook thing – and took the above photo. Beautiful of course, although dry. We haven’t had rain in maybe over a month. My paddock for some reason is greener than most, and my dam is still very full, and generally this area is doing better than other vast areas of this country, which are now crippled by drought. Worse than crippled. This is a quote from “Scrublands”, which goes a small way to describing what it must be like: “The landscape is lifeless, the lack of wind denying even a false sense of animation. The world has stopped turning; it is dead still”.

My imagination can’t even grasp it fully, and I have a healthy one I think, so here are only two images to help:

When there’s no rain, even here, it does something to your psyche. You find yourself checking the weather forecast, hoping for it to signal rain is expected in the near future, worrying if it doesn’t, what it might mean for the horses and garden, and consequently the bank account as you contemplate stocking up on hay and feed and making sure the tanks are regularly filled. Observing some plants already struggling even though I coax them every day with the hose is disheartening. It’s the threat of death that comes with no water. But all that is nothing compared to the devastation the farmers here are experiencing, and the twinges to my psyche I’ve described here are pathetic compared to what they are going through.

It’s easy to feel helpless but it’s also easy to help. This is a plug for the Buy a Bale campaign through Rural Aid. Business owners like myself can obtain a Buy a Bale Barrel for their reception to collect donations. Let’s give back something to the farmers and their families who are doing it tough.

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